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WORK PROJECTS ADMINISTRATION 




•7 . ^ 



BOSTON PUBLIC UBRARTf 



June 30, 1939 



To the Citizens of Ifassachuaetts : 

The Federal Music Project is happy 
to present the following report of recent activities. 

We, as a project, pay tribute to 
our many friends and to the §tate Administrator, 
John J, McDonough, and his staff, whose sympathetic 
understanding have aided our work. 

Thus, in a spirit of appreciation, 
we pause to thank those whose encouragement has made 
possible this project, who have assisted the needy musi- 
cians and advanced the future of music as an art in this 
State, 

Sincerely yours. 
State Director 



C^aie^ &M-c<M^ <^>i^^^^ 9 




ecause the musician is a craftsman , an artist who earns his living by 
sharing his art with others, either by public performance or teaching, 
BECAUSE,mechanical devices have destroyed the opportunities for public 
performance, and the economic situation has reduced the opportunities for 
tefichinga 

BECAUSE, the "talkies", "nickel-in-the-slot" machines and radio-chain 
broadcasting (a chain broadcast may employ one small group of musicians 
in one radio station and service fifty radio stations covering the entire 
nation) have in the space of afew years totally changed the employment 
picture for our musicians, 

BECAUSE, in the city of Boston, alone, ^proximately three-hundred (300) 
musicians regularly earned their livelihood in theatres. During the past 
season 6nly seven (7) men were steadily employed in theatrical work 
throughout the entire city, 

BECAUSE, years of Study, years of experience, and a lifetime service to the 
community were about to be thrown away as "not needed" in this, our 
civilization, 

BECAUSE, th^ Federal Government would not allow such prodigious -craste 
of talent. Conservation of the nation's resources called for. the saving of 
the musical art and the skill of its executants, 

THUS, the Federal Music Project is an outcome of an 3nlightened point of 
view which will allow no want of the necessities of life and will permit 
no diminution of the cultural assets of these United States, 



f 

^^^wolve hundred and fifty (1260) musicims ere fit pressnt employed on this 
project in Massachusetts, Their need of omployinont has been certified by 
local welfare agencies in their hor.e city or tovm. Their professional back- 
grounds have been formally attested to, and thoir ability has been proven 
before an impartial audition board of prominent musicians. 

The musicians on the project are grouped into thirty-nine (39) units four 
symphony orchestras, ten bands, fourteen orchestras, four choruses and 
smaller ensembles. 

The units are located in Boston, Cambridge, Somerville, Newton, Quincy, 
Everett, Bedford, Salem, Lynn, Kfeverhill, Brockton, Fall River, Taunton, New 
Bedford, Worcester, Fitchburg, Springfield and Chicopee, 



project's aim is two- fold, to retain the skill of the needy musician 
and to better equip and aid him for a speedy return to private employment. 
During the past twelve months 2 79 musicians have left for private employment. 
Unfortunately, many were forced to return due to the temporary nature of the 
work. 

One entire unit -The Boston Federal Lfadrigal Singers- organized and 'train- 
ed under Federal Auspices has left on a tour under private employment^ of 
various colleges and universities in the South, Thus, under the policy of 
the Jfusic Project, these singers have been aided to regain their places in 
private industry. 

Eleven members of the Boston Symphony Orchestra are former employees of the 
Federal Music Project, 

Our motto has always been; "Constant improvement "-for the sake of the indi- 
vidual musician, the project and the community. 




Bp rom July 1, 1938 to June 30, 1939, we presented 3,715 concerts before 
an audience of 2,248,659 in the following 157 communities 4 



Abington 


Fairhavon 


Methuen 


Salem 


Agawam 


Fairvi ew 


Middleboro 


Saugus 


Alls ton 


Fall River 


Middle town 


Saxonville 


Amesburv 


Fitchburg 


Milton 


Scituate 


Amhai*l"t 


Framingham 


Montclair 


Segragansett 


Arlington 






Shaws he en 


Att laboro 




Natick 


Shirley 


AwbuniclilQ 


Gardner 


Ne e d ham 


Somerset 


Avon 


Georgetown 


New Bedford 


Somerville 




Glouoester 


Newbury 


South Boston 


Bayside 


Green Harbor 


Newburyport 


Southbridge 


Beaohmont 




Newton 


South Hadley 


Bedford 




Newton Center 


South Hanson 


Belmont 


Hadley Falls 


Newton Upper Falls 


South Weymouth 


Beverly Farias 


Haverhill 


Newtonville 


Springfield 


Boston 


Hingham 


Norfolk Downs 


Squantum 


Bourne 


Holbrook 


North Andover 


Stoughton 


Braintree 


Holliston 


Northampton 


Swamps CO tt 


Bridgewater 


Holyoke 


North Brookfield 


Swans e a 


Brighton 


Hudson 


North Vifaymouth 




Brimfield 


Hull 


Norton 


Taunton 


Brockton 


Hyde Park 


Norwell 


Tewksbury 


Brookline 


Indian Orchard 
Ipswich 


Norwood 


Topsfield 
Turners Falls 


Cambridge 




Oak Bluffs 




Charlesto'wn 


Jamaica Plain 


Orange 


Waban 


Chelsea 




Oxford 


Wakofield 


Chester 


Lake villa 




Walpole 


Chic ope e 


Lawrence 




Waltham 


Cochi tuate 


Leominster 




Watertown 


Cohas set 


Longmeadow 


Peabody 


Wayland 




Lowe 1 1 


Portland, Me 


Webster 


Danvers 


Ludlow 


Pottersville 


Westboro 


Dartmouth 


Lunenburg 




Westf ield 


Dedham 


Lvnn 




West Newton 


Dighton 




Qui no y 


Weston 


Dorchester 


Ma Iden 




V/estport 

IT 


Dover 


Marblehead 




YiTest Springfie 


Dracut 


Marion 




West Towns end 




Marlboro 


Randolph 


Weymouth 


East Boston 


Marshf ield 


Reading 


We;;,Tnouth Heigh' 


East Hampton 


Mattapan 


Revere 


Whitman 


Easton 


Mattapoisett 


Roslindalo 


Wilbf aham 


East V/eymouth 


Medford 


Roxbury 


Wollaston 


Everett 


Melrose 


Rutland 


Worcester 




he progra^is of the Federfl.1 JIusic Project run the entire gamut of musi- 
cal literature, llftiatever your favorite music, a music project unit special- 
izes in that type. Folk song? our colored groups sing them as they should 
be sung. Popular melodies? we sing and play them in the latest fashion. 
Martial music? listen to our bands, Symphony? do you prefer Beethoven or 
Tschaikowsky ? Grand Opera? we sing it in English, making it more appealing 
and understandable tg thousands. Oratorio? the music project is keeping 
this stately form of sacred music alive. Do you wonder that last year we 
attracted millions of persons to our concerts? 



ederal Music Project activities are consistently non-competitive. Our 



aim is not to put the few rexaainii^ privately employed musicians out of work 
but to open up new fields for our unemployed musicians and in this way in- 
crease the future need for musical services* 




,Fjl n doveloping new fields v/e havo encour? ^ed psyin^ audiences, groups of 
citizens v;ho could form a nucleus for future self-support for our musicians. 
Such sponsorship has doubled in the past 12 months, 
A fev/ examples of recent sponsors are: 

Vilhitman Kiwanis Club 

Lawr-ence Turn Vorein 

Turners Falls Rotary,' Club 

Norv/ood Teachers Association 

Arlington American Ler-ion Post 

Boston Lfu.'eum of Fine Arts 

Regis College 

Vfestfield Women's Club 

Boston College 

Ifessachusot ts State College 

Wi Hist on Acrdemy 

I'ilheaton College 

Lions Club, Gloucester 

Kiwanis Club, Brockton 

Andover Teachers Association 

Harvard University 

Simmons College 

Emmanuel College 

Hudson Teachers Association 

Bridgewater State Teachers College 



EDITORIAL COO.IENTS 



From the Brockton Daily Enterprise: 

*'l/¥hen Opera comes to Main Street and Main Street goes to Opera, it is 
more than a rally for the enjoyment and encouragement of one of the 
fine arts. Music lovers assist a good cause, advance appraciation, 
of good music, strengthen the city's cultural side. The Government 
has bean praised often and critized as often for extending its 
bounty to the arts as well as to the crafts in time of distress. 
Except for sueh help, however, opera could not come to Main Street," 

From the Lynn Item: 

"Lynn lovers of the better things of life must be encouraged by 
the evidence of culture furnished by the presence of 8000 music 
lovers in the Manning Bowl this week to hear grand opera present- 
ed under floodlights by the Coimnonwealth Chorus and the State Sym- 
phony Orchestra under Federal Music Project auspices." 

From the Fall River Herald Newss 

"The fine public concerts provided by the WPA bend on Sunday even- 
ings for the past two years, hit the popular fancy, delighting the 
thousands gathered to hear the strf.ins of many of the popular and 
classical selections of the day. 

From the Norwood Daily Messenger: 

"There was a time when Norwood people rsther looked down the nose 
at Federal i'usic Projects, That time is over. The concerts given 
by the teachers and the women's club in Junior High School were 
outstanding examples of the really magnificent work this group is 
doing. The capstone was put on the Federal Music plan in the 
three splendid Sinfoniettas which Orient Lodge has already spon- 
sored at Masonic Temple, Federal Music has "arrived" as far as 
this town is concerned," 

From the Dedham Transcript: 

"if the bringing to Dedham of the Opera produced no other profit 
than what it brought of new musical interest to the boys and girls, 
Mr, Liddell and his assistants deserve much praise for conceiving and 
carryin^, out the project. But adults as well as young people enjoyed 

the Opera, With so excellent an opportunity as the, Federal 

Orchestra and Chorus provides, v/hy not see to it thft Dedham has its 
share of this kind of music?" 



_ 





^1 n presenting sponsored concerts, we have received funds which have 
aided us in the proper operation of the Project, 

In addition, good will created throur;hout the state induced many commun- 
ities to contribute toward the non-labor expenses of our Project, 
As a result, the Federal Govomment has contributed funds for labor, only, 
for the past year and a half, with ISissachusetts residents paying for all 
items of non-labor. Every cent of Federal Honey for the Federal Music 
Project has gone to the musicians in salaries. 



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tiMnnwiHMiiiwiB*umiiwin**^ m i H <jlli>i 



jJI^ he child is our future concert performer and audience. Thus, any aid 
that we could give in enriching his musical education would be an invest- 
ment for the future. 

With the cooperation of superintendents of schools, principals, music- 
supervisors, and teachers, we have done our utmost in developing our 
yo\ing music lovers^ School authorities early recognized the value of tliis 
work. As a result, we are today unable to fill the demands for this our 
service, . . 

During the past school year, we have preser^ted music-appreciation concerts 
in 533 schools in 91 communities in Lfessachusetts , The concerts were 1468 
in number and our youth-audience 699,107 , 



COIvCffiNTS BY MASSACHUSETTS EDUCATORS 



Mr, J. Clement Schuler, Director of I.!usic, Springfield Trade School, 
Springfield 

"Not only has it created and stimulated interest in our schools, 
but it has been a very definite educetive force as well," 

Mr, Herbert T, Rich, Headmaster, Brighton High School, Brij;hton 

"I was very much pleased with the series of concerts given by 
your .Symphony Orchestra, They were a rare musical treat and 
more than satisfied our anticipation," 

Mr. Arthur P, Hsuck, Director of Instrumental Music, Eraintree High School, 
Braintree, 

"The various student bodies have greatly enjoyed these concerts 
and the principals and teacriers have commented most favorably on 
the high educational content of ench concert," 

Mr, Oscar F, Raymond, Winthrop District Principal, Brockton 

"Now we all look forward to the concerts by this band ns one of 
the educational features of our assemblies," 

llr, VYr<lter F. Downey, Hendmnstor, English High School, Boston 
(Present Massachusetts Commissioner of Education) 

"Over 700 students listened and were most enthusiastic in their 
reception of the Band," 

I.!iss Edith Sullivan, Principal, Ashlrnd School, Brockton 

"We have gained a grert der.l of music appreciation from these con- 
certs and ergerly await them from time to time," 

Mr, Frederick J. Murphy, Ilaster, Oliver Wendell Holmes Intermediate 
District, Dorchester, 

"I want you to know that the teachers and the pupil's enjoyed the 
concerts given by these artists m.ost fully. We considered the 
programs a distinct contribution to our school life, valuable in 
the extreme," 

Sister Jfery Ernesta, Principal, Holy Trinity High School, Roxbury 

"The concert given was very fine and the conductor's explanations 
of the selections offered were very instructive. Both teachers 
and pupils appreciated the concert,* 



Miss Dorothy C. Evans, Junior High East, Arling^ton 



"The instrument demonstration reinforces our class work most Rbly,** 

Mr, John J. Desmond Jr., Superintendent of Schools, Chicopee 

"It has been a pleasure for us to cooperate with you, rnd the re- 
sults of my observation indicste to me that the pupils and tho 
teachers have profited by these concerts," I trust that the pro- 
gram may continue next year," 

Mr, John Kilmartin, Principal, School Dopartment, Fitchburg 

"The upper-grade teachers have had but instrument charts to illus- 
trate orchestral instruments. The concrete fonn of presentetion 
far surpasses this mothod," 

Mr, Ernest Pitman, Principal, Richmond School, Dn.nv:jrs 

"The principal, faculty, raid student body of the Richmond School 
extend to you rnd your Federal Bind of the Works Progress Ai- 

ministration for Llassachusetts a most sincere ftppreciation for the 
excellent, instructive, Rnd entertaining program," 

Rev, Francis J, Carroll, Principal, Bernard High School, Fitchburg 

"I feel that the students got much of these performances. They 
were indeed worthwhile and I would like to see them continued," 

Mr, 'Vnlter C. Crmeron, Principal, Lincoln Jr. High School, Framingham 

"I feel thet this organization has really built up r.n pppreciation 
of and a liking for good music rjnong our boys nnd girls ,,,,,,,,,, I 
certainly hope that this type of Federal Project will bo continued," 

Mr, John J, Lynch, Principal, E, E, Lnwrence Jr. High School, Holyoke 

"The Orchestra and Symphony were marvelously trrined rnd were so 
earnest in thsir work thr.t the spirit entered the souls of our 
youngsters, 

I'm anxiously looking forward to their return next yerr, I'm 
happy thrt I had th^m in my building rnd thrt my pupils had the 
privilege of soeing and hearing them. Come agrin and often," 

Mr, Harvey S. Gruver, Superintendent of Lynn Public Schools, Lynn 

"While it hr s not been my privilege to attend all of these band 
and orchestra concerts, I did attend several rnd was very highly 
pleased v/ith the type of music rendered," 



Sister Francis I^onica, S. T,, Parochial Schools, Newton 



"The childron not only enjoyed, but g-^iined much in the musical 
field fr'or. the demonstration, E-^.c'i. iiit^trummt v;as explained and 
its musj'-^i ■''alue :;hovm. Such vc-ir' is cvrely worthvvhile. 

Ifr, William A, Tjlch, Superintendent of Schools, Peabody 

•*! v/ish to ©ypress my sincere thPnk.T for the music appraciution 
programs v/nich you ara again furnishing to the scliools of this 
city. 

"In ridition to the inherent value of tiie music and the explanation 
of the ty;xs of instrument, the attitudes, dispositions and con- 
duct of your men during these perfornances serve as an excellent 
example for our children, 

**! fjn strongly of the opinion that t?iis project has well justified 
its institution and is of practical vr. lue to our children," 

Mr, Ernest L, Collins, Headmaster, Quincy High School, Quincy 

"Our anticipations regarding symphony concerts by your group were 
more than satisfied. We were gratified to learn that we had devel- 
oped a rgal appreciation for such music among our young people. 
Your j^roup, with the competent director, hrd much to give us, and 
they ^ave it very gladly. I have heard nothing but praise for the 
concerts find we are looking forward to another group of concerts 
next year," 

Mr, Rudolph Sussman, Headmrster, High School, Reading 

"This orchestra thrilled our school of six hundred students, and 
it contributed vastly to their appreciation of music," 

Mr, Arthur E. Tierney, Principal, I,fery T, Ronan School, Revere 

"It was enjoyed by the five hundred pupils attending and speaks 
volumes for the work being performed by the unit, 

"I hope the project lasts indefinitely and I look forward to a 
return visit," 

Miss Vera C, Wentworth, Principal, Sweetser School, Saugus 

"The leader chose a program of music that was both educational and 
entertaining, 

"It is my sincere hope that the ITusic Project may continue, so that 
the boys and girls may enjoy more of these splendid, worthvriiile 
programs," 



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Mr, Dwight S, Davis, Principal, Senior High School, Leominster 



"You will be interested to know that the .Federal Orchestra 
which played here,I,Iay 17, to about seven hundred students, presented 
a program which was entertaining as well as educational, 

"I do hope thf.t our own government will emulate the example of 
European nations in mnintnining enough Federal orchestras to aid in 
the musical education of our boys and girls. At present there are 
no other means available for educating these young people in the 
beauty of symphony orchestration," 

1.1^, Arthur F« Ijfershnll, Principr.l, Shepard School, Lynn 

"Such concerts are a definite contribution to educrtion, and you 
and your r.ssooiates are to be congratulated on your excellent show- 
ing." 

Ur, Edwin A, Damon, Principr.l, Pickering Jr. High School, Lynn 

"The music has been very well adapted to the understanding of the 
pupils and interestingly described and presented. Because of the 
training of the members of the band we are confident that the 
pupils have had a rare opportunity to -become appreciative of good 
band music rendered by able musicians, 

"We are hopeful thpt these concerts may continue to be held and 
that we may be privileged to enjoy them during the next school 
year," 

Sister John Ignatius, St, Ifery's Boys' High School, Lynn 

"You will never know what it meant to our boys. They appreciated 
every minute of it," 

Mr, Earl F» H. Emarson, Director, Industrial Arts Division of the Senior 
High Schools, Lynn 

"We deeply appreciated the interest you have displayed in making 
it possible for us to enjoy the music of your organization. We 
feel that those concerts make a valuable contribution to the lives 
of our students," 

Mr, Charles H, Woodbury, Principal, Roosevelt School, I'elros© 

"They presented an instructive and highly appreciated program," 



Mr, Howard R, Randall, Prinoipel, School Department, St ought on 



"Your progrnm -.vas both entertaining and educative, an objective 
for whioh we strive in ePch assembly," 

Mr, Herbert K, Archibald, Headmaster, Senior High School, Watertown 

"Indeod the concerts were very well given here at the Watertown 
Senior High School and we are looking forward to another series 
of three coacerts next year, I believe you are rendering a very 
distinct service to the youth of today in building up bette r appre- 
ciation for the fine work in music. Keep up the good work," 

I.!r, S, Leo Madden, Principal, Bicknell School, North Weymouth 

"It was very entertaining as well as instructive and hope we may 
have return dates in the near future," 

I'lT, Everett G, Sherwin, Principal, North High School, Worcester 

"Those concerts were extremely high grade. The benutiful classical 
music introduced by informative tfilks by the director were of def- 
inite educational value," 

I.'iss Ilarion D, Twiss, Principal, Roosevolt School, Worcester 

"Thank you for a delightful rnd worthwhile program," 

Miss Grace A, Gilkey, Director, David Hale Fanning Trade School for Girls, 
Worcester 

"We do appreciate this service, I feel that the girls get much of 
cultural value from the excellent concerts,...," 

Mr, William F. Bucler, Lamartine Street School, Worcester 

"Our pupils have enjoyed and profited very much by the concerts 
given byytjur units at the school, 

"Our children do not get much opportunity to hear good music well 
played and so we have been very grateful to the musicians who have 
come and given them worthwhile concerts," 



I.fr, Harry C, Darling, The Huntington School District, Broclrton 

"WPA band concerts were first admitted to our school program grudg- 
ingly, YiTe felt it a necessary act of charity. Now we consider 
listening to the concerts a privilege and an educational oppor- 
tunity. Time is gladly alloted for them," 





Id Peoples* Hoiie:;, Children's Home^. Kosp.ta.i.c. V'^herf^rs' Homes, in- 
stitutions of every d«isci'iption, are regularl.'- vi^ic -.d - d n'-tr^oinentGl- 
ists and singers. It is our joy to be of servj.czj i-^ tht^so hoi^pis,. 
As one State Institution doctor recently stated: '••J'>-is trkes care of their 
mental troubles -—our worst enemy#'* 

During th^? past twelve-month period, we presented 84o concerts in the fol- 
lowing 86 institutions : 



ATTLEBORO 

Attloboro Sanatorium 
Bristol County Hospital 

BEDFORD 

U, S, Veterans' Hospital 
BOSTON 

Ijlass, General Hospital 
Home for the Aged 
rfome for Aged Women 
Prendergast Preventorium 
Channing Home 

Health Unit (Blossom Street) 

Ladies' Helping Hand Home 

Dennison House 

Lincoln House 

Boston State Hosoital 

Health Unit (North Margin Street) 

Shaw House 

Altenheim Home 



Roxbury Neighborhood House 

lit. Pleasant Home 

liarriet Tubman House 

House of the Angel Guardian 

Home for Destitute Catholic Children 

Trinity House 

Boston Seamen's Friend Society 
Infirmary 

Catherine Ho ore House 

Loring-Gree:T.ough House 

Charlestov.Ti State Prison 

Home for Aged Colored Women 

West End Community House • 

Soldiors-Snilors Club 

Jaiuaica plain neighborhood House 

BRAIIITPE£ 

Norfolk County Hospital 
BROCKTO N 

Wales HoiTie for the Aged 



) 



GAIIBRIDGS 
Home for Agod 
Margaret Fuller Houso 
Cambridge Sanatorium 
Cambridge Neighborhood Houso 
Holy Ghost Hospital 

CHELSEA 
Soldiers' Homo 
Marino Hospital 

C HI CO PEE 

Chicopee City Infirmary 
DAI^VSRS 

Danvcrs State Hospital 

FALL RIVER 
Eorao for the Aged 
Tuberculosis Hospital 
City Homo 

FITCHBURG 
City Infirmary 
Burbank Hospital 
Old Ladios Homo 

HOLYOKE 

Holyoko City Homo 
Brightsido Institution 
Boa vcr -Kelly Homo 

L/iKEVILLE 

Lakcvillo Sanatorium 

Lu-J.'RENCE 

Burko Memorial Hospital 
LOVJELL 

Chelmsford Street Hospital 
St. John's Hospital 

LYHN 

Lynn Hospital 
1;LVLDEN 

Maldon Homo for the i\gcd 
City Infirmary 
Harriet E, Sawyer Homo 
Community Houso 

MIDDLETON 

Essex Sanatorium 



NEW B EDFORD 
Sassaquin Sanatorium 

NEVjTON 

Home for the Aged 
NORTHAl'APTON 

Northampton State Hospital 
Leeds Veteran Hospital 

RUTLAND 

U. S. Veterans Hospital 
SALEM 

Salem Health Camp 

SOUTH HANSON 

Plymouth County Hospital 

SPRINGFIELD 
Home for Aged Women 
Convent of Good Shepherd 
Home for Aged Men 
City Infirmary 

Springfield Isolation Hospital 
TAUNTON 

Taunton State Hospital 
TEimSEURY 

Tewksbury State Hospital 

WALTHhlvl 

Metropolitan S^ate Hospital 
WESTBORO 

Westboro State Hospital 
>reST Ng;/bURY 

House of the Angel Guardian 

V/EY^IOUTH 

Wo^Tnouth Hospital 



VmCESTER 

Summer Street Hospital 
Home for Aged Men 
Vforcester State Hospital 
Home Farm 

Worcester City Hospital 
Belmont Hospital 
Home for Aged Vfomen 




JJ^ he summer time wouldn't be complete without bsnd concerts in the parks. 
The I'usic Project is doing its share toward carrying on this pleasant tra- 
dition. Throughout the state, in countless parks, our units are making hot 
summer evenings more enjoyable for thousands who might otherwise have little 
or no recreation. 

Here are some of the parks ^^fhere our units are playing this summer. 



Forest Park 


Rickey Park 


Springfield 


Ifedf ord 


Boston Common 


Town Hall Plaza 




Webster 


South Common 




Lowell 


Waltham Common 


Brooklawn Park 


Bprry Park 


New Bedford 


L'edford 




Foss Park , 


Ward Park 


Somerville 


Marlboro 






Lafayette Park 


South Lawrence Common 


Fall River 


Angle Pond 


Buttonwood Bark 


Haverhill 


New -Bedford 




Lake View 


Splem Willows 


Worcester 


Lynn Common 


Dorchester Park 




Boston 


Crocker Park 




Ilarblehead 


G.A.R. Park 




Haverhill 


Amesbury Park 


Tufts Park 


Hopkinton Common 


South Medford 






he chief funation of the Composers* Fcrvim has been to encourage native 



larly inspected manuscripts submitted by Nev/ Englf.nd corposers. Rehearsal- 
readings have been arranged much to the profit of the composers. In addition 
many a public performance has brought to the American people worthwhile works 
which otherwise could not have received recognition, 

122 Ifcinuscripts have been received durinp; the past year of which 83 were 
accepted for possible performance. 

This encouragement of American composers has awakened the public to the fact 
that we have in this country worthwhile composers of worthwhile music. 



creators of music. 



A voluntary committee of prominent musicians has regu- 



usic-teachers in need «ind children from impoverished families 
here join hands in aiding each other. The teacher is restored to his right- 
ful usefulness in society and the child receives music instruction which, 
but for the Federal Mus^.c Project, it could not afford. An average of 3,000 
pupils are thus taught each week and a ray of sunshine has entered 3,000 



otherwise desolate homes, 

SOIv!E CITIES AND TOWNS mffiRB TE/.CIiERS DIVISION IS OPERATING 



Abington 


Hedford 


goston 


Milton 


Bi*aintree 


Quincy 


Cambridge 


Randolph 


Chicopoo 


Rever e 


Dedham 


Salem 


East IToymouth 


Somorvillo 


Everett 


South Kadley 


Fall River 


Springfield 


Framingham 


Vtfaltham 


Ho lb rook 


Welle^ley 


Holyoke 


W^33t field 


Jjowell 


Wost Springfield 


Ludlow- 


Wo burn 


Lynn 


Worcester 


l^lden 


Vfatertown 



In every instance, fre^' teaching space is donated by local citizens for the 
use of the projects. 







he average musician oaplpyod Is a seasoned artist « 
His average age is 42,4 years 

average musical study 6,6 years 
average employment 17,7 years 

( 257 Theatre-musicians • 25 years 
107 Band musicians - 17,8 years 
524 Dance musicians - 12,6 years 
The average musician is too old to learn a new profession or trade; he has 
invested much money and a number of years in study of the art; he has served 
his community well during the best part of his life *• he is willing to con- 
tinue this service. 



WORK. PROJECTS ADMIKISmilON 

Division of Professional and Service Projects 
FLORENCE S. KERR Assistant Administrator 

JOm\I J. Mcdonough state Administrator 

The Federal Music Project 
WILLUM C. IIAYFARTH Deputy Director 

GEORGE FOSTER Regional Supervisor 

WILLIAi'I HADDON State Director 



Mimeographed and Published by Information Service 
Federal Music Project of Massachusetts 
Photographs Reproduced by Multilith Reproduction Service 
WPA Production Division 



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